February 14, 2016

Strasburg Christian Church

On High Street, Strasburg, VA

It's really cold here! I was able to photograph the church from the comfort of the car but I had to get out to get a picture of the walking tour sign across the street.

Historic Strasburg, Stop #8

"The Christian Church (United Disciples of Christ) was organized in 1856. Services were held in a school house at the corner of Holliday and High Streets or in homes. The first part of the church was erected in 1872 and remodeled in the Romanesque Revival style in 1912.

In 1872 James Sonner built the house at 187 High Street for his family. He is considered to be the master builder of Victorian homes in Strasburg. Notice the unique decorative details he used on the house. For many years this was the home of Jack Crawford, a distinguished resident and renowned collector of Indian artifacts.
Fort Street, heading south from High Street, is the old road that led to the Shenandoah River. Before a one lane bridge was constructed in 1914, travelers crossing the river used the "town ford" at the end of this road or the "river bend ford" about one mile upstream or "Jack's ford," one mile downstream. After the bridge on South Holliday Street opened in 1970, the old bridge was torn down.
The Federal style house at 201 High Street, known as Academy Hall, was built in the 1820's. The room on the west side was an early school.
Strasburg's Public Schools occupied the property to the right of Academy Hall. Peter Stover, founder of Strasburg, and his son Christian donated the lot to the town for educational facilities. From 1804 until 1992 classes were held in various buildings in the complex. The building you see today was built in 1926 to replace the Strasburg Academy, which held classrooms and the Town Hall. A fire in 1968 and the construction of larger schools at new locations brought school days to an end on High Street. It is hard to imagine that this quiet setting was once filled with the sounds of children, buses, and bells.

On this side of the street, at 192 High Street, is another house built by James Sonner. It served as a parsonage for nine ministers of St. Paul Lutheran Church from 1884 until 1981. Small reminders such as the stained glass window at the front door remain.

The residence at 144 High Street was built in 1884. All of the walls, interior and exterior are constructed of brick. The mansard roof is a distinctive feature of Second Empire architecture. This was the home of W. H. Ellifrits, Shenandoah County's House of Delegates Representative from 1960 to 1964."

13 comments:

  1. Wonderful coverage of historical church.

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  2. love those front doors. so pretty. & the round stained glass windows area. very fancy. ( :

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  3. It would great to view all those windows from the interior.

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  4. It is a beautiful church. I love the red doors.

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  5. that's a gorgeous church! did you get snow today? we ended up with about 10 inches, crazy!

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    1. Only a couple of inches followed by sleet.

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  6. What a gorgeous church! I love the rounded front.

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  7. Beautiful building and interesting history.

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  8. Unusual architecture for the feont of a church.

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  9. The round area is quite unusual for a church.

    Whatever snow you got has come this way... we're supposed to get 40 centimetres out of the current storm.

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  10. I love the design of the church, quite different from most.

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  11. You know... they sure don't build churches like they used to do. Now Days... you can hardly tell it is a church.

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