September 1, 2014

What Happened to Horntown?


abandoned house When we drove through the small town of Horntown, Virginia, I noticed several abandoned houses on the main road. I don't know the story behind them.



17 comments:

  1. the 2nd one is quite lovely in its age. sorry about the damage on the first.

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  2. It's sad to see the decline of a one-time community. It makes you wonder about the story behind it all.

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  3. Such a shame to see the old houses go back to nature.

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  4. If only those walls could talk....

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  5. It's kind of sad to see these. Makes you wonder about the stories and people behind them.

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  6. always sad to see houses abandoned like this.

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  7. Wow that is pretty sad and so many different homes. I wonder if they were damaged by a storm.

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  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Could the State have bought them up to widen the road? Makes you wonder what is going on.

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  10. The story is simple. After WWII people moved away. That generation went to the cities in search of opportunity. Horntown was a thriving place 100 years ago. But it declined, especially after the 1960's. The older folks died, and their children already had established their lives elsewhere.

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  11. I was born and raised there. It was a wonderful town to grow up in. Another 1974, people just started going to move to bigger towns for job opportunities. My father died in 1970 and he had a body shop and my grandparent moved around 1976 due to health issues. My mother and I moved to Delaware because of jobs also. Wish I could back time up. Horntown was just so peaceful and beautiful. Have many memories of living there.

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    1. Thank you for the story of Horntown. The area has a lot to offer.

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    2. I lived in the house that is burned in the 1950s. Debbie - I knew your grandparents, parents and was your sister's childhood BFF in those days. TI went back for thhe fir time in 1990 to discover they took that house and turned it in to a mult-family house. The burned house was built before the Civil War and had the most beautiful woodwork and lots of hidden passages in it .... great place for inquisitive kids. Saddens me to see the grand lady burned like this.

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    3. Debbie - I knew your grandparents, parents and was your sister's childhood BFF in the middle 1950s when my family lived in the house that's burned. In those days folks referred to this house as either The Big House or Grandma Parker's Place (some thought she still walked throughout the house). The house was a grand dame of pre Civil war architecture with glorious woodwork throughout, wrapping porches and for the inquisitive child a playground of hidden cubbies and stairwells. I went back in 1990 for the 1st time to find they removed all the wrapping porches and and turned it in to a mulifamily place. Sad to see she's burned beyond repair and to see so many homes boarded up.

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