May 16, 2018

Bunker Hill Mill in West Virginia


The Bunker Hill Mill Complex is not very far from the Virginia State Line so I drove there after an errand in Winchester. I'd like to go back to Bunker Hill some time to see the other historic sites.

The mill was built in the late 19th century on the site of an older mill that burned down. You can read about it and more on the nomination form to the National Register of Historic Places.

A "Washington Heritage Trail" sign gives some history of the mill. The trail is a "scenic byway inspired by the prominent footsteps of George Washington."

"Bunker Hill was a thriving community in the 1820's with at least 10 mills, a brick plant, a copper shop, and other industrial operations. This 2000 acre dispersed village was established by General Elisha Boyd, the owner of Martinsburg's Boydville Estate. Bunker Hill Mill was one of the earliest mills, which was operational in 1738. It was built by Colbert Anderson who purchased the property from his father Thomas Anderson. It was rebuilt in 1890 and is the only mill in the state featuring dual water wheels. The present gristmill structure contains 19th and 20th century milling equipment that is still in operating condition. 
Many Civil War battles took place in the Bunker Hill area. Three of the town’s original church buildings, badly damaged during the Civil War, still stand today. In 1890, freed African American slaves established “Black Row,” a residential area in town. Only a few of the buildings remain."


Across the road from the mill is the old Mill Creek School. I did not find information on this building but it looks like it may have been moved here (rescued) from another location.

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7 comments:

  1. ...mills and barns, two of my favorites! Thankfully many mills were built with stone and they are still around to enjoy. Thanks for sharing, enjoy your week.

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  2. It reminds me a little bit of an old mill that stands south of the urban areas that still produces flour here.

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  3. Very interesting post, Linda. When I think of Bunker Hill, I automatically think of the Civil War... We are watching a documentary about the Civil War right now.... SO SAD.

    Hugs,
    Betsy

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  4. Replies
    1. Not hardly! I heard them coming and decided to get them in the picture. Almost missed them; they were moving fast!

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  5. Linda,

    I wasn't sure where Bunker Hill was in West Virginia so I checked it on Google. It's on the eastern panhandle. The only time I've been in that part of the state is when we traveled to New England a few times but that was just a passing through thing. The northern part of the state is beautiful I hear but I've not seen it for myself. This is a really pretty community. I like the old school. Thanks for sharing!

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  6. Interesting history. I like that pretty red barn, and it is neat to see the old school house that was rescued too.

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